MBA Salaries

Rank

Business School

Pre MBA
Salaries*

Median Total
Pay Package

Percent
Increase

1

U. of Pennsylvania (Wharton)

$60,000

$156,000

160%

2

Northwestern (Kellogg)

$56,000

$142,000

154%

3

Stanford

$65,000

$165,500

155%

4

Harvard

$65,000

$160,000

146%

5

Columbia

$50,000

$142,500

185%

6

Duke (Fuqua)

$49,000

$128,500

162%

7

MIT (Sloan)

$55,000

$149,000

171%

8

Chicago

$55,000

$140,000

155%

9

Cornell (Johnson)

$50,000

$135,000

170%

10

Dartmouth (Tuck)

$50,000

$149,500

199%

11

Michigan

$50,000

$131,000

162%

12

NYU (Stern)

$45,000

$140,000

211%

13

UC -- Berkeley (Haas)

$50,000

$135,000

170%

14

Virginia (Darden)

$50,000

$135,000

170%

15

Yale

$45,000

$130,000

189%

16

UCLA (Anderson)

$55,000

$136,500

148%

17

Carnegie Mellon

$45,000

$125,000

178%

18

UNC -- Chapel Hill

$48,000

$125,000

160%

19

Texas -- Austin (McCombs)

$45,000

$107,000

138%

20

Indiana (Kelley)

$42,000

$114,000

171%

21

USC (Marshall)

$45,000

$112,000

149%

22

Purdue (Krannert)

$35,000

$101,500

190%

23

Rochester (Simon)

$40,000

$110,000

175%

24

Georgetown (McDonough)

$45,000

$116,000

158%

25

Washington U. (Olin)

$42,000

$109,000

160%

 

The average salary increases shown above range from 138% at UT Austin to 211% at NYU (Stern). Not a bad return at all!
 
Before you take this table too seriously, we want to clearly state that these numbers are simply averages. If you decide upon graduation that you would like to work for a small start up with a nice (longer-term) options package (we concede those days are probably gone until the business cycle comes full circle again) or if you decide to work for a large Fortune 500 with good job benefits and security, then you are NOT going to make the these 6 figure salaries your first year out of your MBA program.
 
* Pre MBA salaries are estimates as certain MBA programs do not collect this information from their incoming students. Those schools that do report these salaries use self-reported information anyway and, hence, may not be slightly inflated.
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